Blog

Three Benefits to Securing a Large Loss Site

Fires, by their destructive nature, consume the evidence of their initiation and progress as they grow. Often investigations are compromised, and scenes are further destroyed unintentionally by fire services, emergency medical and law enforcement whose primary responsibility is to save lives and protect people and property against further damage. The press and curious individuals attracted to large fire scenes can also complicate investigations and damage evidence, making security a necessity.

Below are three benefits to securing a large loss site:

  • Having security on a large loss site gives the adjuster time to review the policy, check their limits, find the named insured, and see if there are any exclusions in the policy. It also allows for the adjuster to get the right experts on the scene and seek legal advice if necessary. Time spent at the beginning of a claim can drastically speed up the process, making both the client and insurance company extremely satisfied.
  • Security also allows adjusters the ability to determine the liability and to prevent any further liability from occurring, while at the same time addressing any safety issues that may be present.
  • Lastly, security allows the adjuster to identify and address subrogation potential and to keep the continuity of any evidence. Insurers must demonstrate to the courts that proper procedures were established to preserve the continuity of evidence. If the site is not protected, unauthorized people entering the scene could remove or damage evidence that may be key to the insurance company’s case to determine liability or to seek subrogation.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

10 Suspicious Behaviours Associated with Retail Theft

Are you aware of the suspicious behaviours associated with retail theft? See our list below of the 10 Suspicious Behaviours Associated with Retail Theft!

  1. Suspect(s) carrying empty and/or large shopping bags.
  2. Suspect(s) entering stores with backpacks or duffle bags.
  3. Suspect(s) taking merchandise to restrooms.
  4. Suspect(s) dressed in heavy clothing and unseasonal attire to help conceal stolen goods.
  5. Suspect(s) shopping with strollers and/or carts.
  6. Suspect(s) piling stacks of merchandise.
  7. Suspect(s) looking at ceilings and cameras.
  8. Suspect(s) overly friendly and asking a lot of questions as a distraction tactic.
  9. Suspect(s) paying more attention to staff and their location then the actual merchandise.
  10. Suspect(s) moving merchandise from it’s original area to a lower visibility area of the store. Typically a less travelled or low visibility area of the store.

Learn more by watching our retail theft webinar, click here. To learn how ASAP Secured can help fight retail theft visit: www.asapsecured.com

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

Leave a Comment (0) →

Logistics in Security

canada-flag

Implementing security measures at public events is always a challenge. The amount of delay and inconvenience caused by security needs to be weighed against the visitors’ experience and the overall goal of the event. At sporting events, games are ongoing throughout the year and security has the advantage of experimenting with different measures and improving upon methods where needed. For a ‘one off’ event, it is more difficult as there is only one chance to get it right.

On Canada Day in Ottawa, many people wanted to get to Parliament Hill to see the festivities. The security inside the Parliamentary precinct was the responsibility of the RCMP and the Parliamentary Protective Service, which also managed the lines and screening stations. Some people waited three to four hours in line waiting to get on Parliament Hill. Some people breezed through security, but others were left angry and frustrated. Many took to social media or contacted newspapers with their complaints such as “Ottawa should be embarrassed,” “Shame on Ottawa,” and “Ottawa failed its tourists”.

Darlene Macartney of Toronto complained of disorganization and poor services for those waiting in line. “You wanted us to come to Ottawa. We came. We spent over the top exorbitant prices for hotel rooms,” she wrote. “We got up early in the rain to line up for what we thought might be two hours to get onto Parliament Hill. No. We waited 5 and a half hours with no exaggeration,” Macartney wrote.

The capacity for screening was not adequate to deal with the number of visitors and the times at which they arrived. Ottawa had aimed to screen 8,000 people per hour with two screening stations, but that was based on the expectation people would arrive dressed for summer weather. In fact, they came in rain gear, many with backpacks, food, and drinks since there was no food available in the area.

Logistic principals could have been improved upon by eliminating bottlenecks in line. Perhaps, the two screening stations should have been more flexible and either increased capacity or added a third screening station to deal with the peak in demand.

I think the screening protocols were well thought out, and instructions were clear, so changing these to speed the process up would not have been a good idea. This would have created an increased risk, which would not have been acceptable.

On a positive note, Canada Day’s celebrations were enjoyed without any major incidents, and the security was sufficient.

 

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Ontario Minimum Wage Increase and the Security Industry

blog-2

Ontario’s pay rate increase is legislated to take effect January 1, 2018, and January 1, 2019. Maybe this is perfect timing to discuss the security industry. The goal of all security companies is to recruit best in class security guards. I think it is time for the industry to get the opportunity to re-define the security profession. Back in 2002 when I started in the industry, I recall there used to be a line of candidates in the office wanting to become security guards. Today this does not happen anymore! The ministry has changed the licensing requirements. So, to even be considered, the ministry has mandated that applicants invest 40 hours of training, pay to register and get their security licence.

This can cost a perspective security professional in upwards of $350.00 to get licensed. In addition, if the applicant is currently employed in a different sector, the candidate would have to take numerous days off for training to qualify for the license. What would motivate someone to invest in this process? Maybe it is time for security services to take a hard look and re-evaluate its process and pay grade and collectively set the benchmark for the industry to bring back applicants knocking on our doors.

Please comment on this post as I welcome any feedback.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

Leave a Comment (0) →

What Makes a Company ‘Good’?

employee-engagement

This topic may interest you because you are either:

  • Looking to justify your dislike of your current employer with thoughts of:
    • My company is not like this, that must be why I hate going to work
    • This must be why I feel so depressed working here
  • Looking to justify your affection for your current employer with thoughts of:
    • My company is like this, no wonder I enjoy going to work in the morning
    • This must be why I like working here
  • A family member of mine or enjoy reading my blogs

No matter why you are reading this, I appreciate it and thank you!

While talking with others, I constantly hear complaints about the companies they work for. They range from the employer only caring about stats or numbers to managers micromanaging staff. What I do not hear very often are people praising their employer. Why is that?

Many people read about companies like Google who have a fantastic working culture and really look after their staff and then compare it to their employment situation. Maybe it is unfair because Google is such a large and prosperous company, but would it be that difficult for businesses to duplicate some of those philosophies in a smaller capacity?

So what makes a company good? The answer will be different for each person reading this but there are certain things that most admired companies have in common, and the majority of it revolves around their employees.

  • They treat employees like grown-ups
    • They share information with employees, listen to their ideas (or better yet, actively seek out and act upon their ideas) and assume they are responsible enough to manage their own time
  • They treat people fairly
    • They pay people decently and give them excellent benefits including healthcare, paid parental leave
  • They help employees with their careers and understand that not all are built the same
    • They have strong training programs, reimburse tuition for education outside of work, have active, well thought out platforms for mentoring and provide pathways for non-traditional career paths
  • They understand that people have lives outside of work and that these lives might sometimes impinge on (or even take over) their time and attention
    • They realize that allowing for some work-life give and take means not only that they will not waste time and money on unnecessary turnover, but also that they will build loyalty and commitment
  • They see fun, humour, and relaxation as allies not enemies of hard work

A good company is one that works hard to make sure that their employees are a priority. The best way I can sum this up is with the quote below:

chris-blog

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Seminars

seminar

As with most business professionals, I receive several invites for seminars weekly. Unfortunately, I can only make time to attend one workshop per month and need to decide which one. When selecting, I gravitate towards relevance, and if will it help me become a better leader and increase my knowledge base.

Seminars are a great platform to interact with customers, prospects and a wider audience. It gives you an opportunity to step away from your day-to-day challenges and allows for some reflection time. I have attended some excellent informative events where topics such as Duty of Care, Active Shooter Response and Investigations were part of the program.

Panels are a good way to create more interaction with the audience. A question and answer period after each presentation is a must, as without this opportunity people are left with unanswered inquiries. In each seminar, the quality of the message is the most important, not the number of slides. Presenters must be able to convey the message in an enthusiastic way to engage the audience. When they are true experts with a passion for their topic, the audience will be drawn in.

People remember people and will chat during the breaks about what they just learned. Although sometimes seen as less important, the location and set-up are key for a successful event to create the perfect ‘learning environment’.

Overall, attending well-run seminars is a great way to spend your time to keep learning and developing.

Posted in: Uncategorized

Leave a Comment (0) →

Re-evaluate and Reset

blog1

Time and time again, I hear how a building was broken into, how a retailer got their windows smashed in overnight or is suffering from shrinkage.

In the security industry, this is a bittersweet situation because we know we can be there to provide security services during these times.

Companies need to truly assess – re-evaluate and reset. What is the right procedure – preventative or proactive security? Many industry associations can provide a lot of support in identifying best practices. Reach out and see if any of them have had a risk assessment and what the outcome was. There are industry, brand, and geographical implications to review as well as a corporate security program.

It is a tough one because companies need to weigh the costs of security vs. no security. When there is security, it is difficult to justify the cost when nothing is happening. This becomes a vicious cycle. If you have a security program and are still experiencing theft, maybe it is time to re-evaluate the entire plan. Quality checks in your security program are essential. Most security companies can support and assist you with a quality audit.

Companies have a responsibility to look at industry trends. Are you taking a hit more than your competitors? There are risk assessments that include brand perception that needs to be evaluated along with a holistic security program.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

Leave a Comment (0) →

Nice Guys Finish Last

chris

Nice guys finish last is a saying you have probably heard many times throughout your life, but is it true? I’d love to know who comes out with these types of sayings.

Recently I was lucky enough to meet former NHL player and 2016 NHL All-Star MVP John Scott in Toronto. He was open, honest and didn’t try to tell me what I wanted to hear or talk himself up. We talked for about 20 minutes about each other’s families and our lives, inside and out of our professions. Even though John was able to move his way up the hockey ranks, he had to deal with many hurdles and fight to overcome them. He told me that he was able to do this by being true to himself, being a nice guy and doing the best he could.

This is similar to the way I like to live. I am an easygoing guy but know when to be firm and to stick to my beliefs. I never want to burn any bridges and have been able to grow strong relationships with co-workers as well as my clients. Recently, I met up with an old colleague for lunch to catch up and see how he was doing. He had found a great new job and wanted to partner with my company for some upcoming jobs. He said that he was comfortable partnering with me because I was a nice guy and we had always worked great together. This was not the first time something like this has happened. I believe that it’s because of the relationships I have made by being an honest and kind person.

Hopefully this is true for other people who are similar to John and myself and proof that nice guys don’t have to finish last.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

Leave a Comment (0) →

Missing a Load?

A truck with a trailer full of avocados from the southern US was expected to arrive in Brampton, Ontario on Saturday. When the trailer did not arrive on time, the receiving party started calling the supply chain partner to find out where the trailer had gone missing. This disrupted the delivery to one of the largest grocery chains, leading to unhappy customers.

Cargo loads go missing on a regular basis, specifically in the corridor between Windsor and Montreal. The missing goods are usually high value, easy to sell electronics, pharmaceuticals, and clothing but in the last decade, we have seen it change to include vegetables, fruit and baby formula to name a few. There seems to be a buyer for every type of product.

The MO varies widely from breaking into a parked trailer to taking a trailer or even the truck and trailer completely. Smashing through a fence of a trailer yard and using a cab to hook up the trailer is a common occurrence. Most often the criminals know what trailer to take as they have acquired inside information.

Another way of getting the wanted product is stealing the cab and trailer when left unattended by the driver. Many trucks are left idling when the driver gets out at a truck stop. The thieves quickly drive to a predetermined location to hook the trailer to another cab and then drive off to a warehouse or a dealer that will buy the stolen goods.

The consequences are serious as thefts can result in a financial and reputational loss. Also disrupting the supply chain may lead to empty shelves. Since a company’s reputation is on the line, there is a high rate of unreported thefts.

Several steps can be taken by the trucking, insurance, and logistic industry to help prevent these types of crimes.

  1. Review of the supply chain security

To secure cargo, supply chain partners should employ a multi-layered approach that incorporates the latest technology and fine-tuned basic practices, such as extensive staff training

  1. Do a site risk assessment

One of the most obvious steps for a company to take is to have a site risk assessment done. Even if the security situation is being assessed by an in-house security professional, a second pair of eyes always seems to lead to increased insight. The findings presented in a report can then be used to improve the security situation to reduce cargo crime.

A proper assessment includes a physical inspection, review of procedures and interviews with management and front line staff. The findings will then be discussed with management and recommendations will be formulated. In most cases, the recommendations consist of physical security enhancements (access control or CCTV), development or update of procedures and training of staff. Making front line staff aware of the risks and teaching them how to act in various circumstances will have a positive effect. Not only will it help reduce theft, but it will also boost morale.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

Leave a Comment (0) →
Page 1 of 9 12345...»