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4 Tips for Loss Prevention in Retail


With the holiday season is fast approaching, retailers need to ensure loss prevention practices become part of their everyday routine.

Security is not an illusion – meaning your customers need to know that you are a security-minded store. All personnel must be included in your security program. Having security presence is also a great way to deter and prevent theft. Customers do not enter a store with the intent to steal – 80% of robberies happen when a customer sees an opportunity.

Below are some additional tips:

  • The best theft deterrent is great customer service
    • Thieves do not like attention and need to be left alone to have the opportunity to steal
  • Identify key areas of concern and turn them into hot zones for customer engagement
    • Ensure all employees know which areas are the highest priority
    • Identify the areas on a store map if available
    • Ask employees to walk through the hot zones frequently
  • Treat everyone who walks through your doors as a potential customer
    • Thieves will not always exhibit the same behaviour – train all staff to approach each person and offer great customer service
  • Make it apparent to thieves that you take security seriously and ensure the measures you have in place are well displayed

To learn more about how ASAP Secured can help with loss prevention please visit: www.asapsecured.com

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Logistics in Security

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Implementing security measures at public events is always a challenge. The amount of delay and inconvenience caused by security needs to be weighed against the visitors’ experience and the overall goal of the event. At sporting events, games are ongoing throughout the year and security has the advantage of experimenting with different measures and improving upon methods where needed. For a ‘one off’ event, it is more difficult as there is only one chance to get it right.

On Canada Day in Ottawa, many people wanted to get to Parliament Hill to see the festivities. The security inside the Parliamentary precinct was the responsibility of the RCMP and the Parliamentary Protective Service, which also managed the lines and screening stations. Some people waited three to four hours in line waiting to get on Parliament Hill. Some people breezed through security, but others were left angry and frustrated. Many took to social media or contacted newspapers with their complaints such as “Ottawa should be embarrassed,” “Shame on Ottawa,” and “Ottawa failed its tourists”.

Darlene Macartney of Toronto complained of disorganization and poor services for those waiting in line. “You wanted us to come to Ottawa. We came. We spent over the top exorbitant prices for hotel rooms,” she wrote. “We got up early in the rain to line up for what we thought might be two hours to get onto Parliament Hill. No. We waited 5 and a half hours with no exaggeration,” Macartney wrote.

The capacity for screening was not adequate to deal with the number of visitors and the times at which they arrived. Ottawa had aimed to screen 8,000 people per hour with two screening stations, but that was based on the expectation people would arrive dressed for summer weather. In fact, they came in rain gear, many with backpacks, food, and drinks since there was no food available in the area.

Logistic principals could have been improved upon by eliminating bottlenecks in line. Perhaps, the two screening stations should have been more flexible and either increased capacity or added a third screening station to deal with the peak in demand.

I think the screening protocols were well thought out, and instructions were clear, so changing these to speed the process up would not have been a good idea. This would have created an increased risk, which would not have been acceptable.

On a positive note, Canada Day’s celebrations were enjoyed without any major incidents, and the security was sufficient.

 

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Ontario Minimum Wage Increase and the Security Industry

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Ontario’s pay rate increase is legislated to take effect January 1, 2018, and January 1, 2019. Maybe this is perfect timing to discuss the security industry. The goal of all security companies is to recruit best in class security guards. I think it is time for the industry to get the opportunity to re-define the security profession. Back in 2002 when I started in the industry, I recall there used to be a line of candidates in the office wanting to become security guards. Today this does not happen anymore! The ministry has changed the licensing requirements. So, to even be considered, the ministry has mandated that applicants invest 40 hours of training, pay to register and get their security licence.

This can cost a perspective security professional in upwards of $350.00 to get licensed. In addition, if the applicant is currently employed in a different sector, the candidate would have to take numerous days off for training to qualify for the license. What would motivate someone to invest in this process? Maybe it is time for security services to take a hard look and re-evaluate its process and pay grade and collectively set the benchmark for the industry to bring back applicants knocking on our doors.

Please comment on this post as I welcome any feedback.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

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Non-Core Policing – A Shift in Thinking

The idea of police concentrating on core assignments and moving other tasks to the private sector (security industry) is nothing new. However, in the last two years, the topic has gained more interest to reduce the growth in budgets.

As police salaries have continually increased over the past decade, the Liberal government now has to face the unenviable task of telling public servants to hold the line. Police are one of the biggest costs for municipal taxpayers and it just keeps growing. This is also the case for provincial police (OPP), but small municipalities are hit the hardest because they do not have a large commercial and industrial tax base to rely on.

One solution is to contract out non-core police duties to security firms. Police officers that make the ‘sunshine list’ are taking routine reports, acting as receptionists at police stations, giving parking tickets and doing the work of administrative assistants. Well-trained security staff can perform these types of duties for less than half the cost. There is no logic in having a police officer directing traffic around a construction site. The security industry does not want to replace police officers, but simply to play a role fulfilling the routine work that doesn’t require police training. With today’s ongoing threats of terrorism, the police service has more important tasks to concentrate on.

Toronto is seriously looking into this issue. In June of this year, an interim report was published “The Way Forward: Modernizing Community Safety in Toronto”. Although the report centres around improving the quality of service, it also recognizes the need for cost reduction and changing primary tasks. The report contains 24 interim recommendations and is expected to be completed by the end of this year. Various proposals may lead to some police tasks, such as paid duty, shifting to the security industry. The current process of paid duty is not well understood and often puts the reputation of the Toronto Police service at risk. The final report will include working with a risk assessment model to ensure off-duty police officers are only used in a paid duty capacity where their skills, authority, and training are necessary.

We will follow these developments closely.

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