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Leadership Training

Many of you must have gone through some leadership training during your career. The experience and effectiveness vary wildly. Sometimes lengthy and expensive training does not generate the desired results. If there is no follow up on the initial training, effectiveness is often low. Experience has proven that taking managers through exercises with some theory before and after generates the best results. The exercises are often remembered and contain good learning elements. The outcome varies based on the instruction, the type of training and the motivation of the group.

I recently attended a leadership training session that involved an outdoor snow exercise. The group was divided into teams of five, and each team had an hour to build a quinzhee. A quinzhee is a shelter carved out of a large pile of snow. Each group received an instruction sheet with the requirements. The team that met the most requirements won the challenge. The space inside the quinzhee had to be large enough to house the group of 5 comfortably for the night. The instructor prepared equal sized piles of snow along with shovels, spades, little rakes and buckets.

As the groups went to work, it was interesting to see the different approaches. One team immediately added more snow to the pile and dug an entrance. Another team took their time reading the instructions and discussed the division of tasks and ideas. One group had to deal with conflicts between members and divisions within the team.

As time progressed, team members started glancing at the competition, and some decided to change their approach. After an hour, the results from each group were very different. Some quinzhees were small, not finished, or collapsed. The instructor evaluated each team on 12 requirements.

The lessons learned from the winning teams were:

  • Take the time to read the instructions (but not too long) carefully
  • Ask questions early on to make sure you understand the requirements
  • Accept a clear leadership structure
  • Discuss capabilities and divide tasks accordingly
  • Evaluate progress regularly and compare with competition
  • Tweak approach where and when it makes sense
  • Check on team members and give support when required
  • Boost the morale with motivational cheers
  • Have a determined approach, not aggressive

The exercise was a good learning experience. It provided new insights but more so confirmed what we already knew. The combination of a physical challenge, a visual result, and a discussion afterward, made for a lasting memory. Furthermore, it proved that good leadership, clear strategy, teamwork, sense of urgency, regular reviews and the right culture make a winning team.

Posted in: Uncategorized

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Post Order Confusion

shutterstock_172646537Everybody in our industry can explain the importance of post orders as a means to clarify roles and responsibilities between parties involved. The most commonly used definition is: Post orders are written documents that clearly outline duties, responsibilities, and expectations of security guards. The client, service provider and security professional fulfilling the role can find out what is expected by looking at the post orders. Often the post orders become extensive and complex. Some sections can be used as a manual in non-urgent situations, while other parts are essential and describe actions that need to be taken in emergencies. To ensure guards know what to do, they should be trained and quizzed regularly. The use of quick reference cards has proven helpful and can also be used as instructions for short term assignments. It is also important to explain the logic behind the procedures. If it makes sense to someone, it is easier to follow and remember.

Even when guards are well trained and know the post orders, they can fail. Specifically in situations when instructions are not fully detailed in the post orders or when it differs from the normal course of action.

On December 19th, 2016, an unexpected tragedy shook the diplomatic world; Russia’s Ambassador to Turkey, Andrei Karlov was assassinated at an art gallery exhibition in front of several TV cameras. Mevlut Mert Altintas, an off-duty police officer, shot him. Although the post orders apparently outlined how to act in a situation like this, the security officers got confused. They should have refused access and inquired with managing authorities before letting the off-duty police officer in. Instead, they were intimidated by the police badge and let him through.

Another example is seen in the film Snowden, when Edward Snowden makes copies of confidential files and exits the CIA building with the files. At the risk of a “spoiler alert” I will refrain from revealing further details, but the post orders were not followed thus leading to an international scandal.

In short, post orders are essential and should be followed to the letter. Training and testing are essential to keep security officers on their toes. Moreover, when in doubt, no access should be given until further verification has been confirmed.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

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