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Archive for March, 2017

Nice Guys Finish Last

chris

Nice guys finish last is a saying you have probably heard many times throughout your life, but is it true? I’d love to know who comes out with these types of sayings.

Recently I was lucky enough to meet former NHL player and 2016 NHL All-Star MVP John Scott in Toronto. He was open, honest and didn’t try to tell me what I wanted to hear or talk himself up. We talked for about 20 minutes about each other’s families and our lives, inside and out of our professions. Even though John was able to move his way up the hockey ranks, he had to deal with many hurdles and fight to overcome them. He told me that he was able to do this by being true to himself, being a nice guy and doing the best he could.

This is similar to the way I like to live. I am an easygoing guy but know when to be firm and to stick to my beliefs. I never want to burn any bridges and have been able to grow strong relationships with co-workers as well as my clients. Recently, I met up with an old colleague for lunch to catch up and see how he was doing. He had found a great new job and wanted to partner with my company for some upcoming jobs. He said that he was comfortable partnering with me because I was a nice guy and we had always worked great together. This was not the first time something like this has happened. I believe that it’s because of the relationships I have made by being an honest and kind person.

Hopefully this is true for other people who are similar to John and myself and proof that nice guys don’t have to finish last.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

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Missing a Load?

A truck with a trailer full of avocados from the southern US was expected to arrive in Brampton, Ontario on Saturday. When the trailer did not arrive on time, the receiving party started calling the supply chain partner to find out where the trailer had gone missing. This disrupted the delivery to one of the largest grocery chains, leading to unhappy customers.

Cargo loads go missing on a regular basis, specifically in the corridor between Windsor and Montreal. The missing goods are usually high value, easy to sell electronics, pharmaceuticals, and clothing but in the last decade, we have seen it change to include vegetables, fruit and baby formula to name a few. There seems to be a buyer for every type of product.

The MO varies widely from breaking into a parked trailer to taking a trailer or even the truck and trailer completely. Smashing through a fence of a trailer yard and using a cab to hook up the trailer is a common occurrence. Most often the criminals know what trailer to take as they have acquired inside information.

Another way of getting the wanted product is stealing the cab and trailer when left unattended by the driver. Many trucks are left idling when the driver gets out at a truck stop. The thieves quickly drive to a predetermined location to hook the trailer to another cab and then drive off to a warehouse or a dealer that will buy the stolen goods.

The consequences are serious as thefts can result in a financial and reputational loss. Also disrupting the supply chain may lead to empty shelves. Since a company’s reputation is on the line, there is a high rate of unreported thefts.

Several steps can be taken by the trucking, insurance, and logistic industry to help prevent these types of crimes.

  1. Review of the supply chain security

To secure cargo, supply chain partners should employ a multi-layered approach that incorporates the latest technology and fine-tuned basic practices, such as extensive staff training

  1. Do a site risk assessment

One of the most obvious steps for a company to take is to have a site risk assessment done. Even if the security situation is being assessed by an in-house security professional, a second pair of eyes always seems to lead to increased insight. The findings presented in a report can then be used to improve the security situation to reduce cargo crime.

A proper assessment includes a physical inspection, review of procedures and interviews with management and front line staff. The findings will then be discussed with management and recommendations will be formulated. In most cases, the recommendations consist of physical security enhancements (access control or CCTV), development or update of procedures and training of staff. Making front line staff aware of the risks and teaching them how to act in various circumstances will have a positive effect. Not only will it help reduce theft, but it will also boost morale.

Posted in: Protective Services and Investigations

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